Urban Tree Conservation By-law: review

Come to a community meeting to develop and discuss citizen-led changes to the Urban Tree Conservation By-law.

This by-law is important because it seeks to conserve larger trees on private property in the urban core. The City of Ottawa is undertaking a review of the bylaw this year. The meeting will provide residents with an opportunity to formulate ideas on how this by-law can better meet its objectives.

When?  Saturday, March 3, 2018 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where? Champlain Park fieldhouse, 140 Cowley Ave.

Mark your calendar, and plan to attend this event on March 3.

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Reducing Waste

The Community Associations for Environmental Sustainability (CAFES) and Waste Watch Ottawa (WWO) met February 10, 2018 to discuss ways to encourage residents and the City of Ottawa to reduce waste, including single-use plastic bags, styro-foam, plastic straws, etc. See the pdf below for the reviewed notes on the meeting, and next steps.

 

Reviewed NOTES – CAFES and WWO meeting Feb 10 2018 & Planned Follow Up

Renewable Energy

People gathered in the CPCA Fieldhouse on February 15 to hear from the Ottawa Renewable Energy Co-op on how they contribute to buildding a local energy supply through smart investments in solar energy. See their site for more information. In our neighbourhood, Steve Cumbaa (Keyworth Avenue) has graciously prepared a short note on his experience with solar panels, which you can access as a pdf, below.

 

Continue reading “Renewable Energy”

Documenting the benefits of trees

Three blocks of trees in the residential neighbourhood of Champlain Park in Kitchissippi Ward (394 trees in all) bring an annual flow of benefits to residents valued at $41, 924 (using the US Forestry Services I-Tree calculator). Imagine the flow of benefits of the Greenbelt and all the other trees in residential areas in Ottawa!

The Neighbourwoods in Champlain Park tree inventory is inspired by Neighbourwoods, an ambitious initiative taking root in communities across Ontario.  Check out these infographics on the inventory and another on the financial benefits to residents in the form of energy consumed, storm water filtered,  air quality improved, and carbon stored.

Deadline: City’s Community Environmental Projects Grant Program

Deadline for the City’s Community Environmental Projects Grant Program is March 31, 2018

Are you looking for an opportunity to put your environmental ideas into action? The City of Ottawa is now accepting applications for the 2018 Community Environmental Projects Grant Program (CEPGP). 

CEPGP provides funding to community groups and non-profit organizations to undertake environmental stewardship projects that support an environmentally sustainable Ottawa.

The application deadline is Saturday, March 31, 2018 at 4:00 p.m

Successful CEPGP grant recipients must complete their projects within one year of receiving their funds. For details on eligibility criteria, the application process, profiles of past projects, and to download an application form, please visit Ottawa.ca/cepgp.  

For more information on CEPGP, please contact Jen Brown, CEPGP Co-ordinator, at 613-580-2424 x 27914 or at cepgp@ottawa.ca.   

La date limite pour présenter une demande dans le cadre du Programme de subventions aux projets communautaires liés à l’environnement de la Ville est le 31 mars 2018

Êtes-vous à la recherche d’une occasion de concrétiser vos idées touchant l’environnement? La période de présentation des demandes à la Ville d’Ottawa dans le cadre du Programme de subventions aux projets communautaires liés à l’environnement (PSPCE) pour 2018 a commencé.

Le PSPCE accorde une aide financière à des groupes communautaires et des organismes à but non lucratif pour mettre sur pied des projets d’intendance environnementale en appui à la durabilité environnementale d’Ottawa 

La date limite pour la présentation des demandes dans le cadre du PSPCE sera le samedi 31 mars 2018, à 16 h. 

Les bénéficiaires d’une subvention dans le cadre du PSPCE doivent mettre leur projet en œuvre dans un délai d’un an après avoir reçu le financement.  Pour obtenir des détails sur les critères d’admissibilité, le processus de demande, profils de projets passés et pour télécharger un formulaire de demande, veuillez consulter Ottawa.ca/pspce.

Pour en savoir davantage, communiquez avec Jen Brown, Coordonnatrice du PSPCE, au 613-580-2424, poste 27914 ou à pspce@ottawa.ca.

Neighbourwoods in Champlain Park – 2017

Spring has finally arrived and the leaves on the trees have come out enough so we can identify the trees and we can once again build the NeighbourWoods survey/inventory. This process will help the community learn about the wonderful resource we have, and the many benefits the urban canopy bring to the neighbourhood.

As a kickoff to the summer’s work for newcomers as well as returning volunteers, come to a day devoted to (re)learning the NeighbourWoods protocol for assessing tree size and condition and to using various keys to identify trees. Bring a friend, bring a neighbour!

Meet at 9 AM Saturday, June 10 at the tree slice at the Fieldhouse, 149 Cowley Avenue (Sunday a rain day).

Contact Catherine Shearer (metshag@gmail.com) or Daniel Buckles (dbuckles@sympatico.ca) for more details, and to RSVP.

https://urbanforestgreenspaces.wordpress.com/projects/neighbourwoods-in-the-champlain-park-project/

Catherine Shearer

Spring Clean Up in Champlain Park

LIFE’S MESSY APRIL 29 WE CLEAN IT UP

Champlain Park is looking for volunteers for our annual Spring Cleanup. The snow is melting extra fast, and trash accumulated over a long winter has started to appear.

The cleanup, part of the City’s Cleaning the Capital campaign, is a chance for neighbours of all ages – kids, teens, and adults – to get together, say hello, and help spruce up the neighbourhood.

Upcoming Projects and Activities
We will also be providing information in the fieldhouse of the upcoming projects and activities (tree mapping, update on the NCC, park expansion, etc.) occurring within the Champlain Park, and providing you with an opportunity to sign up and volunteer if any of them meet your interest and you would like to participate.

We’ll meet at the fieldhouse on Saturday, April 29 at 10 a.m. Juice, coffee, and cookies will be served. There is a map so that people can choose an area to work on. We’ll wrap up by noon. In case of rain, we’ll meet instead on Sunday, April 30.

The designated cleanup areas are the south side of Premier above the transitway; the boulevard on Northwestern and the path at its north end; and along the fence on Patricia and Pontiac and in the Champlain Woods between the fence and the parkway. It can also include the area along the river at the foot of Carleton, or any other public spaces you think could use some help.

We recommend wearing pants and long-sleeved shirts, appropriate footwear and gloves. The City will provide garbage bags.

If you have any questions or suggestions, call Andrea Murphy or Ian Reid at 613-715-9504.

Walk in the woods with naturalist Owen Clarkin

Winter seems to be going, coming back, going … but eventually the buds on the trees will swell and spring WILL arrive. To enhance your appreciation of our urban forest and as a kick-off activity for Champlain Park’s environment activities, join naturalist Owen Clarkin for a walk through the Champlain Woods and various streets to learn how to identify trees when there are no leaves present.

When:    22 April –  rain or shine
Time:     10 am – noon
Where:  Champlain Park Fieldhouse
Event organized by: Catherine Shearer

Refreshments at the Fieldhouse following the walk where Owen will continue to answer questions

Owen Clarkin grew up near Russell Ontario, and has been studying the trees of Eastern Ontario as a dedicated amateur since the age of 4. After finishing a conventional education in the natural sciences, he has been more seriously exploring topics in tree ecology from an Eastern Ontario perspective, together with a core group of colleagues.

Below is a snippet of a previous presentation given by Owen Clarkin a few years ago in South Frontenac.
Clarkin highlighted the not so well known relatives of common trees in the area, like the sugar maple’s cousin, the black maple, which produces a tastier sap than its relative. Continue reading “Walk in the woods with naturalist Owen Clarkin”